Proving age discrimination occurred

| Sep 15, 2017 | workplace discrimination

People get fired from their jobs, refused promotions or refused employment for a number of reasons. In many cases, employers have legitimate reasons for making such decisions; unfortunately, there are those employers who do not. Age discrimination is a big problem right now in Colorado and elsewhere. Proving one is a victim of this type of discrimination is not an easy feat, however. How can a person prove that he or she was fired, refused a promotion or even refused employment based on his or her age?

There are several ways in which one may be able to prove that he or she is the victim of age discrimination. One way is by providing direct evidence, such as comments about one’s age. If any comments are made, the offended party should write them down, note who said them and also document names of any witnesses.

Another way to prove age discrimination is by reviewing one’s disciplinary record. It is possible for one to have a pristine record his or her entire career, but as he or she gets older, the write ups may start to pile up for things that younger employees do without consequence. This could qualify as both age discrimination and harassment.

A few other ways to prove that one is a victim of age discrimination is by providing evidence that one was excluded from training and other employee events, that one’s boss shows favoritism to younger employees, and that promotions and new positions are only going to younger individuals. While business owners will do everything possible to protect themselves and make their decisions look above board, with enough evidence, it may be possible to prove that age discrimination occurred or is occurring in one’s previous or current place of employment. Colorado residents who feel that they are victims of this type of discrimination can turn to legal counsel in order to have their cases reviewed and to receive assistance in filing any legal claims — if appropriate.

Source: aol.com, “6 Ways To Prove You’re A Victim Of Age Discrimination“, Donna Ballman, Accessed on Sept. 15, 2017

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