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June 2013 Archives

Settlement reached in Colorado wage and hour claim

A Colorado class-action law suit filed in federal court has been dismissed with prejudice in a U.S. district court when a settlement was reached between the two parties. The plaintiff, a previous employee of a fine dining restaurant, had filed the class-action wage and hour claim on behalf of himself and two other employees on the grounds that the employer was running a mandatory tipping pool. The wage and hour claim alleged that the tip pool violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

Tactics on how to address instances of age discrimination

For many Colorado residents, dreams of retirement have fallen by the wayside as the economy continues a slow pace of recovery. More and more workers are having to work past the age that they had planned to retire, and many see no light at the end of that tunnel. Recent statistics suggest that these workers may face a sizable hurdle in the form of age discrimination.

Gender-based pay gap may not disappear for 44 years

Women in Denver may have noticed that the federal Equal Pay Act recently had its 50th anniversary. The law was enacted to address the huge difference in pay female employees received for doing the same jobs as their male colleagues. While progress has been made in addressing this form of employment discrimination, employers on average still pay female employees less than men. The U.S. Equal Employment Commission predicts that it could be decades before this discrimination finally ends.

Pregnant women find their jobs in peril due to discrimination

In theory, women in the workplace are supposed to be protected from discrimination through a pair of federal laws. The 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth or related medical problems by employers with at least 15 employees. Also, the 2008 expansion of the Americans with Disabilities Act has largely been interpreted to require reasonable accommodations for pregnant employees to allow them to continue to work until they give birth, though pregnancy is not legally considered a disability.

Catholic school teacher fired after getting pregnant wins lawsuit

Federal employment laws that religious institutions in Denver must follow often try to balance the rights of employees not to be discriminated against or wrongfully terminated against the employers' right to practice its religion. In a recent wrongful termination case in another state, the court interpreted the law to say that a Catholic archdiocese did not have the right to fire a teacher because she got pregnant outside of marriage.

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